opinion

Keep your notes as up to date as your knowlege

So I’m sitting here refreshing myself on SQL Performance tuning by having a leaf through Grant Fritchey’s (blog|twitter) updated SQL Server 2012 Performance Tuning

Stuart Moore

Stuart Moore

Nottingham based IT professional with over 15 years in the industry. Specialising in SQL Server, Infrastructure design, Disaster Recovery and Service Continuity management. Now happily probing the options the cloud provides

When not in front of a computer, is most likely to be found on the saddle of his bike

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Stuart Moore

About Stuart Moore

Nottingham based IT professional with over 15 years in the industry. Specialising in SQL Server, Infrastructure design, Disaster Recovery and Service Continuity management. Now happily probing the options the cloud provides

When not in front of a computer, is most likely to be found on the saddle of his bike

The Internet – My saviour and My nemesis

Like any good SQL DBA these days, the internet is a godsend to my career and professional development. I can quickly and easily find articles and notes from world experts on complex topics, and even interact with those experts as well via twitter, email or skype. Compared to the bad old days of having to know someone’s phone number, or battling through tiers of support to get to someone who knew something this is absolutely amazing.

But, on the other hand…….

How many of us are now used to a user (of many levels) coming across to our desk, or dropping us an email about a great new technique they’ve just seen on a random internet search. The canonical examples are with (nolock) and the ever classic one about restoring deleted rows directly out of transaction logs.

As always these are things where the correct answer to “Is this a good idea?” is “It depends”.

As SQL Server DBAs/experts we’ve worked hard to build up a level of internal filtering that lets us look at the post on StackExchange or Twitter, step back and evaluate if it’s something that’s really a good idea. We’ll then have taken it away and played with it on development systems before we think about adding it to our toolkit so we’re fully aware of the techniques limitations. And if we ever do have to deploy it in a production environment we’re also well aware of the amount of work that’s needed, and the amount needed if it goes wrong, and we’ll know which mug will be fixing it,

Stuart Moore

Stuart Moore

Nottingham based IT professional with over 15 years in the industry. Specialising in SQL Server, Infrastructure design, Disaster Recovery and Service Continuity management. Now happily probing the options the cloud provides

When not in front of a computer, is most likely to be found on the saddle of his bike

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
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Stuart Moore

About Stuart Moore

Nottingham based IT professional with over 15 years in the industry. Specialising in SQL Server, Infrastructure design, Disaster Recovery and Service Continuity management. Now happily probing the options the cloud provides

When not in front of a computer, is most likely to be found on the saddle of his bike

Please tell me I’m wrong

Go on. Please? I know noone likes to be shown they’re wrong. But being told you’ve got something wrong is great motivator to try and find out if you are. The quickest way to spur someone into really researching a subject than to point out a purported flaw in there knowlege. And it feels great when you find out you’re right, and even if you’re wrong, you know now the right answer.

This can be one of the best parts of a training course. Get 2 DBAs on a course (this is especially good if it’s a non Database course) and watch the sparks fly when there’s a difference of opinion on the wording of something. There’ll either be a great raging debate, or a lot of furtive googling while the instructor isn’t watching. Maybe even quoting of famous SQL bloggers or referring to obscure manufacturer briefing documents. Then at the next coffee break there’ll be a conversation about what was actually meant, arguments from experience, pleading that it was how the last version worked, arguing that it depends on OLTP vs OLAP/VLDB vs LBD/Sparc vs Itanium, makes difference if you’re on SAN rather than DAS, ad nauseum, ad infitum.

But the important thing is that one or more person is going to learn something, and that’s the most important thing. The minute you stop learning something you stop progressing as a DBA or IT professional, and you might as well resign yourself to doing the same thing for the next 30 years.

So please, tell me I’m wrong. Ill thank you for it in 20 years…………

 

Stuart Moore

Stuart Moore

Nottingham based IT professional with over 15 years in the industry. Specialising in SQL Server, Infrastructure design, Disaster Recovery and Service Continuity management. Now happily probing the options the cloud provides

When not in front of a computer, is most likely to be found on the saddle of his bike

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus

Stuart Moore

About Stuart Moore

Nottingham based IT professional with over 15 years in the industry. Specialising in SQL Server, Infrastructure design, Disaster Recovery and Service Continuity management. Now happily probing the options the cloud provides

When not in front of a computer, is most likely to be found on the saddle of his bike